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Are you still using PC Anywhere?

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A Breach is coming your way

Why? Have you ignored the requests from Symantec about ceasing useage of this product because of Symantec’s code breach? If you are unaware…read it from a trustworthy news source.

It’s simple…Symantec had its code stolen. The thieves tried to extort money out of Symantec and Symantec got caught trying to initiate a sting. So the code base for PC Anywhere is about to be made public.

That means that any hacker with a knowledge of compilers can, and will, create a tool to gain entry into your home or work systems. It means that your data is at risk of being compromised. It means that your credit card information and other vital information that could embarass you, that you keep on your computer, is likely to be stolen.

Do you need an alternative to PC Anywhere? You should’ve said so. I’ll cover that aspect tomorrow.

You should really pay attention to privacy policies

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Privacy and data collection

Google has been getting slammed lately in the tech media space for it’s blog post ( http://j.mp/z5Z5EO ) declaring that they are unifying all of their privacy policies into one massive policy. What has happened is that Google is being accused of violating it’s initial rule–“Don’t be evil.”

Evil is actually in the eye of the beholder as Google is not saying they are selling our personal data. They are merely sharing it across their own platforms to serve their own needs. As long as Google keeps this data internally and does not share it with third parties, I have no problem with that.

What I would like however, is to have control over the data that Google has gathered about me and the ability to change or delete it when Google does turn evil, which all for profit companies must do if they are to survive.

There are hundreds of companies who make billions of dollars off of each our personal profiles. Our criminal records, our driving records, and even how much money we gave to our local dog-catcher’s re-election campaign are all part of data sets that large companies like ChoicePoint, and Insurance Services Office sell to their customers. Even your prescription records are acrued and compiled to be resold by Milliman and Ingenix.

I would venture a guess that those who fear our federal government’s intrusion into our private lives have never searched deeply into who they should really be worried about. Private companies exist for one purpose…to make rich people richer. Government exists for one reason–to do for people what they cannot do for themselves.

Fearing government regulations is one thing that many Americans do but it’s misguided. Regulations on private business are necessary to keep our food and our money safe.

What is arbitration and why you should care about

 

Scotus would allow the makers of this device the safe harbor of arbitration

SCOTUS would protect the makers of this fraudulent medical device

 

Everyday thousands of Americans enter into new contracts with credit card issuers, mortgage companies, new home builders, and many many other large corporations.

I would venture a guess that 95% of most of these consumers think that is something goes haywire, like your new home develops cracks in the foundation or the lender modifies your contract 60 days after you’ve signed it, that you can seek some remedy in a court of law.

You can kiss having your day in court goodbye. Today 95% of all contracts between businesses and consumers have some sort of binding arbitration clause in their agreements. And on January 9th, 2012 the U.S. Supreme Court, in an 8-1 decision said that binding arbitration clauses in contracts are just that…binding and cannot be overturned.

The reason why so many companies are forcing mandatory binding arbitration clauses on their customers is that in many cases the terms for arbitration are buried deep within the paperwork your banker, broker, or realtor has you skip over just to get your signature.

In addition, the company gets to pick the arbitrator, the state of the arbitration, and the terms that you can seek arbitration under. So a Texas resident with a beef against a California credit card company would have to take the time, and money, out of their lives to go to California for the arbitration hearing.

And even then the deck is still further stacked against the consumer.

According to statistics compiled by the University of Colorado and Smart Money magazine, consumers have won approximately 4% of the arbitration cases heard. In 2009, the Minnesota State Attorney General sued a major arbitration firm because of alleged close ties to the banks the firm heard cases from. The major banks also named in this suit temporarily dropped their arbitration clause but you can expect that it will be back and enforced as soon as the type can be set on each company’s word processors.

It’s this simple…pay attention to what you are signing and where you buy high dollar items from. In some cases, you should shop around and even if it costs a few dollars more, you should get your loans, credit cards, and other financial instruments from those companies who do not have these clauses in their agreements but if people do not pay attention and keep buying and lending from whomever is cheapest or easiest, then you can expect to see 99.5% of all American based companies using arbitration clauses in their paperwork.