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Are you still using PC Anywhere?

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A Breach is coming your way

Why? Have you ignored the requests from Symantec about ceasing useage of this product because of Symantec’s code breach? If you are unaware…read it from a trustworthy news source.

It’s simple…Symantec had its code stolen. The thieves tried to extort money out of Symantec and Symantec got caught trying to initiate a sting. So the code base for PC Anywhere is about to be made public.

That means that any hacker with a knowledge of compilers can, and will, create a tool to gain entry into your home or work systems. It means that your data is at risk of being compromised. It means that your credit card information and other vital information that could embarass you, that you keep on your computer, is likely to be stolen.

Do you need an alternative to PC Anywhere? You should’ve said so. I’ll cover that aspect tomorrow.

I’m back and posting; more Symantec code stolen; and why your Apple really needs an antivirus

After a nine month hiatus, I am back and posting. No I did not have a baby but I did change jobs. I’m no longer the DOD contractor geek but now I’m a full time college professor teaching, among other things, security.

So let’s get started…Symantec initially said that hackers may have stolen their code base but it was for old products. Well that was not entirely truthful. Symantec’s latest announcement said that source code for Norton Antivirus Corporate Edition, Norton Internet Security, pcAnywhere, and Norton GoBack had been taken. This is in addition to the Symantec Endpoint Protection 11.0 and Symantec Antivirus 10.2 that the company acknowledged two weeks ago.

What does this mean? Well if you are one of the many who use Symantec products, it means that you will need to be very careful about what updates for the Symantec software you download. Some of it could be fake.

Also puncturing a hole in a mythical secure operating system, is F-Secure’s announcement that the number of trojans, malware, and loaders for Apple MacOS products climbed this week.

Last year, F-Secure noted that Apple products enjoyed a roller-coaster ride of security. With some months being better than others. Best bet…if you have a Mac, get an antivirus.

And finally…I will be revamping this site a little now that I have more time to devote to it. Remember that the key to keeping crap off of your home computer is to be smart and not download or visit sites that are known for pushing malware on to user’s PC’s. Use Firefox with the NoScript add-in and above all else…stay away from porn and gambling sites.

Clicking on an Osama picture can be hazardous to your computer

Malware purveyors keep looking for the next thing to convince you to click on download/”Look at this!” type of links. Sunday night’s announcement of Osama Bin Laden’s (I don’t really care if I spell that name right–the terrorist doesn’t deserve for it to be spelled correctly) death and the subsequent details coupled with America’s thirst for blood and gore mean that the pickings are ripe for malware purveyors.

So Facebook users…you’re up first. You are a prime target because most of you are not all that computer saavy and most click on anything that looks tantalizing…afterall if it looks salacious it must be awesome, right? And also if no one knows I clicked on the gory details link, what’s the worst that can happen? After all, there is that big “X” in the upper right hand corner of my browser right?

The FBI knew this was going to happen and issued a press release to the American public warning people about such links:

“The FBI today warns computer users to exercise caution when they receive e-mails that purport to
show photos or videos of Usama bin Laden’s recent death. This content could be a virus that could
damage your computer. This malicious software, or ‘malware’, can embed itself in computers and
spread to users’ contact lists, thereby infecting the systems of associates, friends, and family members.
These viruses are often programmed to steal your personally identifiable information.”

So what does this mean to you, the common user? It’s simple. Until the Obama administration announces it has released photographs and/or videos, there are no such things. You should pay full attention to the FBI’s warning. Click on nothing that you do not know. Click on only those things you were expecting and from trusted sources after using your anti-virus/anti-malware to the fullest.

Finally…if you do accidentally stumble into one of these traps…follow the regular steps to remove malware viruses from your computer. If you don’t know what these are, then you should be extra careful about the things you click on.

The Epsilon Breach Just Keeps Getting Worse

When it first happened, media from CNN, Fox, Time, NY Times, Washington Times, and other popularity driven news organizations did the lazy thing and reported the press release that Epsilon and those companies who turned over your personal information to Epsilon wrote to give the information they wanted you to think was true.

Epsilon Breach Press release

But the information contained in that release, like most press releases, is misleading at best and downright false at worst.

Here’s why…spam and spear phishing are the least of your worries in a breach of this kind. Coupled with other information email addresses, usernames, and companies you deal with can tell a lot about you and give identity thieves and identity sellers, loads of personal information to gain access into your life.

Not to mention that the folks who stole this information want you to turn over your computer to them. While they don’t want the electric bill from running it, they do want to use its CPU cycles, ram, and hard drive space to rent out to spammers, malware providers, adware servers, adult oriented material, child pornography, and let’s not forget about general mischief.

So how do you protect your from all of this sad activity?

1) Never click on links in incoming emails.
2) Use a good anti-virus/anti-malware/firewall.
3) Use common sense. Do not load photos/images just because a friend, an acquaintance, or someone else you may know sent them to you. Using steganography, a user can load javascript loaders, into the cutesie images that are sent to you and those can be used to begin delivery of malware, spyware, or other stuff you just don’t want on your system.
4) Stop sending emails that are meant to be forwarded. These give hackers an idea about which users are more susceptible to attack than others.

Finally–the reason why spam and malware continue to spread is because people are allowing the tools that come with their PC’s to expire, or just think a sofware firewall is sufficient. And let’s not forget the profit margin. Sending spam is quite profitable and people keep opening it, reading it, and responding to it.

It’s so profitable in fact, that many of the original spam factories of the 90’s are now legitimate email marketing companies.

So please…take responsibility for your computing actions. If you cannot afford to pay for the Symantec/McAfee software subscription that comes with your new computer…have a tech remove it and install Microsoft Security Essentials, AVG, Avast, Avira, or some other free anti-virus option.