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Create a button to kill a pesky or stuck Chrome browser section

browsersSo..you go to a site to read an article on rooting your Android/Apple phone, you get creative and want the lyrics to a popular song, or you visit a news link to some new media site that you’ve never heard of before but it has a news item that you are interested in and it happens…a popup window in the middle of your screen and it is asking you to some task before you leave (and that includes clicking on a “CANCEL” button on the popup.

First off–DON’T CLICK ON ANYTHING within that browser window. Nothing there is good for you or your computer. Most of these sites are made with CSS, HTML5, and Javascripting. JavaScript has a feature that is deployed in every version and you cannot block it easily, called onUnload().

So no matter where you click on that page or even if you CTRL-ALT-DELETE, you may be subject to something being loaded on to your computer screen.
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Another scenario is that Chrome for some reason is just stuck and will not respond to your mouse clicks and you need it dead NOW!

Okay…I hear you…much in the same way we created a shortcut to kill off Internet Explorer under similar circumstances, we can create a shortcut for your desktop or taskbar that will immediately terminate Google Chrome and it will not trigger any onUnload() event that can harm your system.

So to stop myself from reinventing the wheel, I want you to go over this previous posting — http://tech.jchampion.com/?p=16 and follow the steps to the letter.

The only thing that we are going to change the command you paste into the command line area from “C:\Windows\System32\taskkill.exe /F /IM iexplore.exe /T” to “C:\Windows\System32\taskkill.exe /F /IM chrome.exe /T”

If you want to understand what all your instructions mean it is simple – taskkill.exe is the Windows commandline command to terminate a task by either process identification number or by name.

/F means to force it dead
/IM means the image name to kill
/T is telling taskkill to not only kill the program but any child programs that may have opened up as a result

This is quick, painless and easy. Just follow the steps from above and if you want instructions on all of Taskkill’s options use this TechNet link —

This works in Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Server 2003, Server 2008, Server 2008r2, and Server 2012.

As usual…if you have any questions about this–just ask! Find me on Facebook, Twitter (@jachamp) or via this blog.

john

The Epsilon Breach Just Keeps Getting Worse

When it first happened, media from CNN, Fox, Time, NY Times, Washington Times, and other popularity driven news organizations did the lazy thing and reported the press release that Epsilon and those companies who turned over your personal information to Epsilon wrote to give the information they wanted you to think was true.

Epsilon Breach Press release

But the information contained in that release, like most press releases, is misleading at best and downright false at worst.

Here’s why…spam and spear phishing are the least of your worries in a breach of this kind. Coupled with other information email addresses, usernames, and companies you deal with can tell a lot about you and give identity thieves and identity sellers, loads of personal information to gain access into your life.

Not to mention that the folks who stole this information want you to turn over your computer to them. While they don’t want the electric bill from running it, they do want to use its CPU cycles, ram, and hard drive space to rent out to spammers, malware providers, adware servers, adult oriented material, child pornography, and let’s not forget about general mischief.

So how do you protect your from all of this sad activity?

1) Never click on links in incoming emails.
2) Use a good anti-virus/anti-malware/firewall.
3) Use common sense. Do not load photos/images just because a friend, an acquaintance, or someone else you may know sent them to you. Using steganography, a user can load javascript loaders, into the cutesie images that are sent to you and those can be used to begin delivery of malware, spyware, or other stuff you just don’t want on your system.
4) Stop sending emails that are meant to be forwarded. These give hackers an idea about which users are more susceptible to attack than others.

Finally–the reason why spam and malware continue to spread is because people are allowing the tools that come with their PC’s to expire, or just think a sofware firewall is sufficient. And let’s not forget the profit margin. Sending spam is quite profitable and people keep opening it, reading it, and responding to it.

It’s so profitable in fact, that many of the original spam factories of the 90’s are now legitimate email marketing companies.

So please…take responsibility for your computing actions. If you cannot afford to pay for the Symantec/McAfee software subscription that comes with your new computer…have a tech remove it and install Microsoft Security Essentials, AVG, Avast, Avira, or some other free anti-virus option.

Today’s security tip of the day…

Today’s tip comes from the fine folks at SANS.org—

I have long hated Outlook’s preview pane but…it can be useful to a degree if you configure it properly. First things first…if your version of Outlook has the capability, turn off HTML emails and force them into plain text.

If you are using an older version of Outlook, or if you have managed to reset the security level for e-mails, then you may be at some risk for HTML script-based exploits. Auto-Preview displays the first three lines of the message, enough to identify whether the message is valid, and it displays faster. Here is how to use it.
Disable the Reading Pane and Enable Auto Preview:
1.Open Outlook.
2.Choose View -> Reading Pane -> Off
3.Choose View -> AutoPreview
4.Now you can see what is Junk, and which ones may have an HTML payload.