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Time to clarify what Geico, State Farm, and OnStar are selling you

No to in-car monitoring

Progressive claims this tool is used for discounts only

“You’ll save with our snapshot discount,” “State Farm has identified you as driving a vehicle with OnStar built into it. We are offering you a discount for having this service.” and there are many other examples of this.

Let us get to the heart of what this is.

For those of you who like to drive all over town but tell your insurance carrier that you drive to work and back only, these devices will root your out and you will receive a hefty price increase instead of the promised price decrease.

Someone would have to be nuts to allow any insurance company to monitor your activity, your driving habits, or let OnStar share your driving information with anyone. Why?

Simple…if you have ever heard of the term “red lining,” which is taking the crime statistics from any community and drawing a red mark on a map and anyone living or working in those areas get to pay higher car insurance rates because you are more at risk than someone who lives and works in a more affluent part of town.

That means that, in terms of odds, you are more likely to have something happen to your insured vehicle. It also means that the insurance company is more likely to see a claim from you.

So enter this world of “snapshot”,”OnStar”, and the various other devices insurers are trying to dangle in front of you attached to a word, “discount”, in order to get you to bite.

And enough people are biting on this lure and companies like Geico, Progressive, State Farm, All-State, and many others are trying to do anything to get you to let them spy on you more than they already are.

But the information that those devices record about your driving habits are tied into your computer. So if you change cd’s or the radio station while driving, if you change lanes without signaling due to a driver or animal moving into your path, or even something as innocuous as braking too severely will count against you and your discount will eventually morph into a significant rate increase.

From the Snapshot provider’s website about the device:

“Data We Collect:
The Snapshot device records vehicle speed and time of day, and when the device is connected and disconnected from the vehicle. It also records the Vehicle Identification Number upon installation. Other information, such as miles driven and rates of acceleration and braking, is derived from the speed and time information recorded by the device.”

Think about this…insurers tie your credit record into your auto insure rate. They tie in things like non-fault accidents into your rate. That’s not to mention the number of times you’ve been uninsured or placed into a high risk pool.

In short…don’t do it. Keep insurers out of your car unless of course, you are the perfect driver and you never drive anywhere except to home and work or home and school.

And for the record…this is, in my opinion, a polite way of asking “can we please put spyware on to your car’s computer to monitor you?”

The Epsilon Breach Just Keeps Getting Worse

When it first happened, media from CNN, Fox, Time, NY Times, Washington Times, and other popularity driven news organizations did the lazy thing and reported the press release that Epsilon and those companies who turned over your personal information to Epsilon wrote to give the information they wanted you to think was true.

Epsilon Breach Press release

But the information contained in that release, like most press releases, is misleading at best and downright false at worst.

Here’s why…spam and spear phishing are the least of your worries in a breach of this kind. Coupled with other information email addresses, usernames, and companies you deal with can tell a lot about you and give identity thieves and identity sellers, loads of personal information to gain access into your life.

Not to mention that the folks who stole this information want you to turn over your computer to them. While they don’t want the electric bill from running it, they do want to use its CPU cycles, ram, and hard drive space to rent out to spammers, malware providers, adware servers, adult oriented material, child pornography, and let’s not forget about general mischief.

So how do you protect your from all of this sad activity?

1) Never click on links in incoming emails.
2) Use a good anti-virus/anti-malware/firewall.
3) Use common sense. Do not load photos/images just because a friend, an acquaintance, or someone else you may know sent them to you. Using steganography, a user can load javascript loaders, into the cutesie images that are sent to you and those can be used to begin delivery of malware, spyware, or other stuff you just don’t want on your system.
4) Stop sending emails that are meant to be forwarded. These give hackers an idea about which users are more susceptible to attack than others.

Finally–the reason why spam and malware continue to spread is because people are allowing the tools that come with their PC’s to expire, or just think a sofware firewall is sufficient. And let’s not forget the profit margin. Sending spam is quite profitable and people keep opening it, reading it, and responding to it.

It’s so profitable in fact, that many of the original spam factories of the 90’s are now legitimate email marketing companies.

So please…take responsibility for your computing actions. If you cannot afford to pay for the Symantec/McAfee software subscription that comes with your new computer…have a tech remove it and install Microsoft Security Essentials, AVG, Avast, Avira, or some other free anti-virus option.

Build your own IE “eject” button

Sometimes Google sends you to sites where there is no safe place to click.

If you ever find yourself on a page that locks your browser up so that your only choice is to click on a site manufactured pop-up; then you need an eject button and I am going to show you how to make one.

Step one, right click anywhere on your desktop that is empty and choose Create New –> Shortcut

Kill IE shortcut button

An icon/button that you can use to shutdown IE safely

Now you need to give the shortcut some direction and tell it what to do. The command that you would type in DOS to kill IE is:

C:\Windows\System32\taskkill.exe /F /IM iexplore.exe /T

So you need to enter this command into the Target field and then select okay.

Kill IE Screenshot 2

Adding in the command into the target field in Windows new shortcut

Next step–name the shortcut. I call it KillIE.exe

Kill IE Shortcut Screenshot 3

Name that new shortcut

Now you have a perfectly good shortcut to kill a locked browser safely. There is a technical reason why we will kill Internet Explorer in this manner but trust me, this is safer than use CTRL-ALT-DEL/task manager.

Why? Because this way is a rude way to exit IE. Task Manager uses a polite mechanism which politely unloads the content from the Windows. This polite manner gives scripts that lock up your browser a chance to save their place and store data on your computer. The Kill IE tool/shortcut not only simply kills the IE session, it can also be modified to work on Firefox, Chrome, Opera, and other browsers and it is safer because it does not allow a site to grab a foothold on your system.

Questions? Ask John